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  • 1.
    Atusingwize, Edwinah
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Department of Disease Control and Environmental Health, Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda.
    Nilsson, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Egan Sjölander, Annika
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för kultur- och medievetenskaper.
    Ssempebwa, John C.
    Department of Disease Control and Environmental Health, Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda.
    Tumwesigye, Nazarius Mbona
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda.
    Musoke, David
    Department of Disease Control and Environmental Health, Makerere University School of Public Health, Kampala, Uganda.
    Landstedt, Evelina
    Department of Social and Psychological Studies, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Social media use and alcohol consumption among students in Uganda: a cross sectional study2022Ingår i: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 15, nr 1, artikel-id 2131213Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Globally, alcohol use significantly contributes to the disease burden. Alcohol consumption in Uganda is related to several health consequences among young people, including university students. Social media is commonly used by students to share academic information and create social networks. Among young people in high-income countries, previous studies have also shown that social media use can have negative health outcomes related to alcohol use, and associated problems. To date, similar studies conducted in low- and middle-income countries are largely missing.

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of and associations between social media use and alcohol consumption among university students in Uganda.

    METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study among 996 undergraduate students at Makerere University. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Alcohol use in the previous 12 months was the dependent variable. The independent variable was social media use categorised as general use, alcohol-related use, and social media lurking/passive participation. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess associations. Crude and adjusted odds ratios were reported.

    RESULTS: Nearly all students (97%) used social media and 39% reported alcohol use. Regular alcohol use was significantly associated with moderate (OR = 2.22, CI: 1.35-3.66) and high level general social media use (OR = 2.45, CI: 1.43-4.20). Regular alcohol use was also associated with alcohol-related social media (OR = 6.46, CI: 4.04-10.30), and alcohol-related lurking (OR = 4.59, CI: 2.84-7.39). Similar, although weaker associations were identified for occasional alcohol use.

    CONCLUSIONS: Approximately four in ten students reported alcohol use in the past year, and almost all students used social media. Alcohol-related social media use was associated with occasional and regular alcohol use, with stronger associations for regular use. These findings may guide further research and present an opportunity for potential alcohol control interventions to improve health among young populations in low- and middle-income countries.

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