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  • 1.
    Callisto Puts, Isolde
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Myrstener, Maria
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Contrasting impacts of warming and browning on periphyton2023In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, E-ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 628-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested interactive effects of warming (+2°C) and browning on periphyton accrual and pigment composition when grown on a synthetic substrate (plastic strips) in the euphotic zone of 16 experimental ponds. We found that increased colored dissolved organic matter (cDOM) and associated nutrients alone, or in combination with warming, resulted in a substantially enhanced biomass accrual of periphyton, and a comparatively smaller increase in phytoplankton. This illustrates that periphyton is capable of using nutrients associated with cDOM, and by this may affect nutrient availability for phytoplankton. However, warming weakened the positive impact of browning on periphyton accrual, possibly by thermal compensation inferred from altered pigment composition, and/or changes in community composition. Our results illustrate multiple impacts of climate change on algal growth, which could have implications for productivity and consumer resource use, especially in shallow areas in northern lakes.

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  • 2.
    Capo, Eric
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Molecular Ecology Group, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Spong, Göran
    Molecular Ecology Group, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, SLU, Umeå, Sweden; Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology Program, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, North Carolina State University, NC, Raleigh, United States.
    Koizumi, Shuntaro
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Puts, Isolde
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Olajos, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Königsson, Helena
    Molecular Ecology Group, Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, SLU, Umeå, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Droplet digital PCR applied to environmental DNA, a promising method to estimate fish population abundance from humic-rich aquatic ecosystems2021In: Environmental DNA, E-ISSN 2637-4943, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 343-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measures of environmental DNA (eDNA) concentrations in water samples have the potential to be both a cost-efficient and a nondestructive method to estimate fish population abundance. However, the inherent temporal and spatial variability in abiotic and biotic conditions in aquatic systems have been suggested to be a major obstacle to determine relationships between fish eDNA concentrations and fish population abundance. Moreover, once water samples are collected, methodological biases are common, which introduces additional sources of variation to potential relationships between eDNA concentrations and fish population abundance. Here, we evaluate the performance of applying the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) method to estimate fish population abundance in experimental enclosures. Using large-scale enclosure ecosystems that contain populations of nine-spined stickleback (Pungitius pungitius), we compared the concentrations of fish eDNA (COI mitochondrial region, 134 bp) obtained with the ddPCR method with high precision estimates of fish population abundance (i.e., number of individuals) and biomass. To evaluate the effects of contrasted concentrations of humic substances (potential PCR inhibitors) on the performance of ddPCR assays, we manipulated natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (range 4–11 mg/L) in the enclosures. Additionally, water temperature (+2°C) was manipulated in half of the enclosures. Results showed positive relationships between eDNA concentration and fish abundance and biomass estimates although unexplained variation remained. Still and importantly, fish eDNA estimates from high DOC enclosures were not lowered by potential inhibitory effects with our procedure. Finally, water temperature (although only 2°C difference) was neither detected as a significant factor influencing fish eDNA estimates. Altogether, our work highlights that ddPCR-based eDNA is a promising method for future quantification of fish population abundance in natural systems.

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  • 3.
    Koizumi, Shuntaro
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Callisto Puts, Isolde
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hellström, Gustav
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Geibrink, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Seekell, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Dissolved oxygen constraints of consumer production in lakes: a whole-ecosystem test of the habitat limitation hypothesisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Koizumi, Shuntaro
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hamdan, Mohammed
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Biology, College of Science for Women, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq.
    Callisto Puts, Isolde
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Byström, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Experimental warming and browning influence autumnal pelagic and benthic invertebrate biomass and community structure2023In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 68, no 7, p. 1224-1237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    1. Globally, lakes are warming and browning with ongoing climate change. These changes significantly impact a lake's biogeochemical properties and all organisms, including invertebrate consumers. The effects of these changes are essential to understand, especially during critical periods after and before the growing season, that is, autumn and spring, which can determine the composition of the invertebrate consumer community.
    2. In this study, we used a large-scale experimental pond system to test the combined effect of warming (+3°C) and increased input of terrestrial and coloured dissolved organic carbon (gradient of 1.6–8.8 mg/L in the ambient and 1.6–9.3 mg/L in the warm)—which causes browning—on zooplankton and benthic macroinvertebrate biomass and composition during the autumn and the following spring.
    3. Total zooplankton biomass decreased with warming and increased with browning, while total zoobenthos did not respond to either treatment. Warming and browning throughout the autumn had no overall interactive effects on zooplankton or zoobenthos. Autumnal warming decreased total pelagic consumer biomass, caused by a decrease in both Rotifera and Copepoda. In contrast, there was no effect on overall benthic consumer biomass, with only Asellus sp. biomass showing a negative response to warming. An autumnal increase in dissolved organic carbon led to increased total pelagic consumer biomass, which was related to increases in Daphnia sp. biomass but did not affect zoobenthos biomass. While we expected zooplankton and zoobenthos biomass to follow responses in primary and bacterial production to treatments, we did not find any relationship between consumer groups and these estimates of resource production.
    4. Our results suggest that consumer responses to warming and browning during autumn may lead to less overarching general changes in consumer biomass, and responses are mostly taxon-specific.
    5. This study gives novel insights into the effects of warming and browning on consumer biomass during autumn and spring and increases the understanding of the effects of climate change on invertebrate community biomass in the different habitats.
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  • 5.
    Myrstener, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Fork, Megan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Biology, West Chester University, PA, West Chester, United States.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Puts, Isolde
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hauptmann, Demian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Isles, Peter D. F.
    Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, 1 National Live Drive, VT, Montpelier, United States.
    Burrows, Ryan M.
    School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Burnley Campus, VIC, Burnley, Australia.
    Sponseller, Ryan A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Resolving the Drivers of Algal Nutrient Limitation from Boreal to Arctic Lakes and Streams2022In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 25, p. 1682-1699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrient inputs to northern freshwaters are changing, potentially altering aquatic ecosystem functioning through effects on primary producers. Yet, while primary producer growth is sensitive to nutrient supply, it is also constrained by a suite of other factors, including light and temperature, which may play varying roles across stream and lake habitats. Here, we use bioassay results from 89 lakes and streams spanning northern boreal to Arctic Sweden to test for differences in nutrient limitation status of algal biomass along gradients in colored dissolved organic carbon (DOC), water temperature, and nutrient concentrations, and to ask whether there are distinct patterns and drivers between habitats. Single nitrogen (N) limitation or primary N-limitation with secondary phosphorus (P) limitation of algal biomass was the most common condition for streams and lakes. Average response to N-addition was a doubling in biomass; however, the degree of limitation was modulated by the distinct physical and chemical conditions in lakes versus streams and across boreal to Arctic regions. Overall, algal responses to N-addition were strongest at sites with low background concentrations of dissolved inorganic N. Low temperatures constrained biomass responses to added nutrients in lakes but had weaker effects on responses in streams. Further, DOC mediated the response of algal biomass to nutrient addition differently among lakes and streams. Stream responses were dampened at higher DOC, whereas lake responses to nutrient addition increased from low to moderate DOC but were depressed at high DOC. Our results suggest that future changes in nutrient availability, particularly N, will exert strong effects on the trophic state of northern freshwaters. However, we highlight important differences in the physical and chemical factors that shape algal responses to nutrient availability in different parts of aquatic networks, which will ultimately affect the integrated response of northern aquatic systems to ongoing environmental changes.

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  • 6.
    Puts, Isolde
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Verheijen, Hendricus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Norman, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    An ecological and methodological assessment of benthic gross primary production in northern lakes2022In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 13, no 3, article id e3973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Benthic gross primary production (GPP) is often the most important part of aquatic food webs in northern lakes, which are gradually warming and receiving increased terrestrial colored dissolved organic carbon loadings due to global change. Yet, measurements of benthic GPP are fairly uncommon, and methods and unit dimensions of benthic GPP are unstandardized and rarely compared. In this study, we measured benthic GPP in 27 headwater lakes from three regions in northern Sweden and analyzed potential constraining drivers of benthic GPPz rates at discrete depths and estimates of benthic GPP averages across the whole lake, as well as across the littoral zone. We also compared in situ measurements of benthic GPP averages across the whole lake with modeled values using the “autotrophic structuring model.” We found that benthic GPPz rates were best explained by, and positively related to, available light (i.e., a function of depth and water color) and temperature. Benthic GPP averages across the whole lake, on the contrary, were best explained by the relative size of the littoral area, which is a measure that combines lake bathymetry and water color. The comparison between in situ measured and modeled estimates of benthic GPP averages across the whole lake revealed that (1) the autotrophic structuring model underestimates GPP at low values and overestimates GPP at high values compared with measured data, and that (2) measured values were related to temperature, which is not included as a variable in the autotrophic structuring model. Considering future predicted changes impacting northern latitude lakes, our results suggest that increased lake water temperatures can to some extent mitigate the negative impacts of reduced light availability from lake browning on benthic GPPz rates. The combined impact of these changes on benthic GPP averages across the whole lake will depend on, and be moderated by, lake bathymetry determining the relative size of the littoral area.

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  • 7.
    Puts, Isolde C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Deininger, Anne
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Browning affects pelagic productivity in northern lakes by surface water warming and carbon fertilization2023In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 375-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Global change impacts important environmental drivers for pelagic gross primary production (GPP) in northern lakes, such as temperature, light, nutrient, and inorganic carbon availability. Separate and/or synergistic impacts of these environmental drivers on pelagic GPP remain largely unresolved. Here, we assess key drivers of pelagic GPP by combining detailed depth profiles of summer pelagic GPP with environmental and climatic data across 45 small and shallow lakes across northern Sweden (20 boreal, 6 subarctic, and 19 arctic lakes). We found that across lakes summer pelagic GPP was strongest associated with lake water temperatures, lake carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations impacted by lake water pH, and further moderated by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations influencing light and nutrient conditions. We further used this dataset to assess the extent of additional DOC-induced warming of epilimnia (here named internal warming), which was especially pronounced in shallow lakes (decreasing 0.96°C for every decreasing m in average lake depth) and increased with higher concentrations of DOC. Additionally, the total pools and relative proportion of dissolved inorganic carbon and DOC, further influenced pelagic GPP with drivers differing slightly among the boreal, subarctic and Arctic biomes. Our study provides novel insights in that global change affects pelagic GPP in northern lakes not only by modifying the organic carbon cycle and light and nutrient conditions, but also through modifications of inorganic carbon supply and temperature. Considering the large-scale impacts and similarities of global warming, browning and recovery from acidification of lakes at higher latitudes throughout the northern hemisphere, these changes are likely to operate on a global scale.

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  • 8.
    Puts, Isolde C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Deininger, Anne
    Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Oslo, Norway.
    Jonsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Global change indirectly increases pelagic productivity in northern lakes by accelerating surface water warming and by reducing CO2 limitationManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Puts, Isolde C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Myrstener, Maria
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Contrasting impacts of warming and browning on periphytonManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Puts, Isolde C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Siewert, Matthias B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Sponseller, Ryan A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hessen, Dag O.
    Department of biosciences, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway.
    Bergström, Ann-Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Landscape determinants of pelagic and benthic primary production in northern lakes2022In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 28, no 23, p. 7063-7077Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Global change affects gross primary production (GPP) in benthic and pelagic habitats of northern lakes by influencing catchment characteristics and lake water biogeochemistry. However, how changes in key environmental drivers manifest and impact total (i.e., benthic + pelagic) GPP and the partitioning of total GPP between habitats represented by the benthic share (autotrophic structuring) is unclear. Using a dataset from 26 shallow lakes located across Arctic, subarctic, and boreal northern Sweden, we investigate how catchment properties (air temperature, land cover, hydrology) affect lake physico-chemistry and patterns of total GPP and autotrophic structuring. We find that total GPP was mostly light limited, due to high dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations originating from catchment soils with coniferous vegetation and wetlands, which is further promoted by high catchment runoff. In contrast, autotrophic structuring related mostly to the relative size of the benthic habitat, and was potentially modified by CO2 fertilization in the subarctic, resulting in significantly higher total GPP relative to the other biomes. Across Arctic and subarctic sites, DIC and CO2 were unrelated to DOC, indicating that external inputs of inorganic carbon can influence lake productivity patterns independent of terrestrial DOC supply. By comparison, DOC and CO2 were correlated across boreal lakes, suggesting that DOC mineralization acts as an important CO2 source for these sites. Our results underline that GPP as a resource is regulated by landscape properties, and is sensitive to large-scale global changes (warming, hydrological intensification, recovery of acidification) that promote changes in catchment characteristics and aquatic physico-chemistry. Our findings aid in predicting global change impacts on autotrophic structuring, and thus community structure and resource use of aquatic consumers in general. Given the similarities of global changes across the Northern hemisphere, our findings are likely relevant for northern lakes globally.

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  • 11.
    Puts, Isolde Callisto
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Impacts of global change on primary production in northern lakes2022Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Algae are primary producers, a major component of the aquatic foodweb, and changes in primary production affect aquatic ecology in general. Global changes such as warming, recovery of acidification and changes in land-use have caused warming and browning of northern lakes. Warming is a direct effect of increasing air temperatures, whereas browning is mainly caused by increasing amounts of terrestrially derived colored dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Altogether, such global changes impact important environmental drivers for aquatic gross primary production (GPP). Increased temperatures and nutrient supplementation by DOC at low concentrations enhance GPP, but the browning by DOC at high concentrations inhibits GPP by light reduction, resulting in contrasting controls of global changes on primary production in northern lakes. Primary producers grow in two distinct habitats; free-floating algae (phytoplankton) and stationary periphytic (attached) algae that are restricted to use the light that reaches them. Periphyton includes algae growing on submerged surfaces ranging from nutrient-poor rocks to nutrient-rich sediments (here: benthic algae), and both often exceed pelagic GPP but are overlooked and often simply excluded from algal biomass estimates.

    In this thesis, I investigate how global change influences key environmental drivers of GPP, and how those changes impact GPP in the benthic and pelagic habitat, and the sum and partitioning of GPP between these habitats (the autrotrophic structuring). I do this by interpreting a dataset with GPP measurements in several lakes over the Swedish Arctic, subarctic and boreal landscape that representa wide range of DOC concentrations. I also assess to what extent temperature and DOC impact periphytic algae growth on plastic strips in an experimental study where DOC and temperature are manipulated in 20 ponds. Besides assessing the direct impacts of changes in nutrients and light climate associated with changes in DOC, I assess indirect impacts of global changes on primary production, e.g., through intensified warming, CO2 supersaturation, changes in pH, and the role of landscape processes and properties.

    Results confirm that DOC is dominant in structuring GPP in northern lakes by light inhibition, nutrient supplementation, indirect warming of surface waters, and additionally by CO2 fertilization. In addition, warming can enhance growth rates, but thermal compensation can also lead to reduced algae growth. Moreover, periphytic GPP of algae growing on both soft nutrient-rich sediments and nutrient-poor plastic strips GPP was generally much higher than pelagic GPP, and should thus not be excluded in studies assessing global change impacts on GPP. DOC affects the total GPP, as well as the autotrophic structuring in northern lakes, and likely also higher trophic levels productivity and community composition.

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