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  • 1.
    Kekki, Miika
    et al.
    Department of Social Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland.
    Linde, Jonna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Career counsellors’ professional agency when working with migrants2022In: International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance, ISSN 0251-2513, E-ISSN 1573-1782Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the professional agency of counsellors working with migrants. Using Bernstein’s concepts of classification and framing, our thematic analysis draws on interviews with career counsellors from both Finland and Sweden. The results highlight a need for counsellors to recognise the differences in situations of students with migrant backgrounds and their native peers and adjust their counselling accordingly. They also indicate that counsellors struggle with implementation of the core of their professional agency as a result of societal domination of the counselling agenda and indicate a need for more collective, society-level challenging of this agenda.

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  • 2.
    Linde, Jonna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Sundelin, Åsa
    Department of Education, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    High-Stakes counselling: when career counselling may lead to continuing residence or deportation of asylum-seeking youths2021In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, ISSN 0142-5692, E-ISSN 1465-3346, Vol. 42, no 5-6, p. 898-913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we analyse what happens to career counselling when it is intertwined with the asylum process. A Swedish example is an amendment to the education legislation, regarding residence permits for upper secondary level students. Following the resulting changes in juridical, educational and interpersonal conditions, career counsellors must deliver ‘high-stakes counselling’ that can profoundly affect individuals’ prospects of asylum or deportation. Our analysis is based on ethnographically inspired fieldwork, a survey and Bernsteinian theory. In current Swedish conditions, tight matching to demands of the labour market is essential in this ‘high-stakes counselling’. We conclude that a consequence is institutional introduction of conditional citizenship of asylum-seeking students. This allows countries to select migrants through education, which severely conflicts not only with counselling ideals, but also democratic and equality values regarding possibilities to make choices for the future, thus creating ethical dilemmas for counsellors.

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  • 3.
    Lundahl, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Linde, Jonna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lindgren, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Sundelin, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet.
    Locality and the Prevention of Early School Leaving: Supporting Youth Transitions to Upper Secondary School in a Highly Decentralised Education System2020In: Nordic Journal of Transitions, Careers and Guidance, E-ISSN 2003-8046, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 38-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction programme (IP) intends to facilitate transition to upper secondary education among Swedish youth with incomplete compulsory education. This article aims to explore and understand how local preconditions interact with schools’ support for the IP students. It looks at the local structural and institutional preconditions, and the strategies and work of head teachers, programme officers, teachers, and career counsellors, working in the IP in 90 municipalities of three categories: commuter municipalities close to big cities, rural municipalities, and small cities. The analysis builds on the responses from 139 school actors to a questionnaire, and on public statistics. On average, the commuter municipalities enjoy the most favourable structural and educational conditions, while the rural municipalities are the least resourceful, e.g. in terms of formal professional competence. Surprisingly however, the rural contexts on average perform better than the other municipalities regarding the level of graduation four years after starting the IP. There are few systematic local differences in the work with IP students. However, the IP in the rural municipalities on average enjoy higher support from school leaders, have a clearer division of responsibilities, and separate the students spatially to a lower degree compared to the commuter municipalities. Systematic handover between compulsory schools and the IP is less common in the commuter municipalities than in the other two groups. Whether these factors are relevant for explaining the higher success level in the rural schools and the lower success level in the schools in the commuter municipalities requires further investigation.

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