Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Blusi, Madeleine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Occupational Therapy.
    Factors to consider when introducing digital social activities to older persons with home care2023In: Caring is sharing: exploiting the value in data for health and innovation / [ed] Maria Hägglund; Madeleine Blusi; Stefano Bonacina; Lina Nilsson; Inge Cort Madsen; Sylvia Pelayo; Anne Moen; Arriel Benis; Lars Lindsköld; Parisis Gallos, IOS Press, 2023, Vol. 302, p. 453-457Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social isolation and loneliness have become everyday concerns forpopulations all over the world as these factors are affecting both physical and mentalhealth in a negative way. Feelings of isolation and loneliness are increasinglyacknowledged as a health risk among older persons. ICTs have been recognized aseffective tools to combat social isolation among older people. The aim of this studywas to explore factors of significance when introducing a tablet-based systemproviding digital social activities for older persons with home care. Participants were17 persons, age 70 and older, who lived alone and had assistance from home care.This exploratory study used cross-sectional qualitative data analyzed throughthematic analysis. Three themes were generated: 1) lacking vocabulary related tothe context, 2) intuitive user interface may replace extensive instructions and 3)unwillingness to commit to a pre-defined measure of performance.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Blusi, Madeleine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Nieves, Juan Carlos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Feasibility and Acceptability of Smart Augmented Reality Assisting Patients with Medication Pillbox Self-Management2019In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 264, p. 521-525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complex prescribed medicine regimens require extensive self-management. Handling multiple pills can be confusing; using a pillbox organiser is a common strategy. A smart Medication Coach Intelligent Agent (MCIA) can support patients in handling medicine. The aim of this research was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the MCIA. A prototype was tested with 15 participants, age 17-76, filled a pillbox according to prescription assisted by the MCIA implemented in a Microsoft HoloLens. A quantitative method using questionnaires was applied. Results showed that using the MCIA implemented in an AR-headset, to assist people with prescribed polypharmacy regimen in filling a pillbox, was feasible and acceptable. There was a difference related to age regarding people's willingness to use an AR-headset for medication self-management. People older than 65 felt less comfortable using the technology and were also more hesitant to use the technology than those under 65.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Blusi, Madeleine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Older adults co-creating meaningful individualized social activities online for healthy ageing2018In: Building continents of knowledge in oceans of data: The future of co-created eHealth / [ed] Adrien Ugon, Daniel Karlsson, Gunnar O. Klein, Anne Moen, IOS Press, 2018, Vol. 247, p. 775-779Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social isolation and loneliness among older people is a growing problem with negative effects on physical and mental health. In co-creation with older adults individualized social activities were designed where older adults through computer mediated communication were able to participate in social activities without leaving their homes. Four types of activities were designed; outdoor activity, music event, visiting a friend and leisure activity. A participatory action research design was applied, where end users together with scientists from two research fields developed, tested and evaluated online participation in the activities. Usability and safety of the systems were major concerns among older adults. The evaluation pointed out that level of simplicity, usability and audio-video quality determined the level of satisfaction with the human interaction during the activity, thereby affecting the meaningfulness of the activity. The research presented in this paper constitutes the first step in a long-term research process aiming at developing a digital coaching system that gives older adults personalized support for increasing participation in meaningful social activities.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Fischl, Caroline
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Occupational Therapy. Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Blusi, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Occupational Therapy. Association of Local Authorities in Västernorrland County, Härnösand, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Nilsson, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Section of Occupational Therapy.
    Tailoring to support digital technology-mediated occupational engagement for older adults: a multiple case study2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 577-590Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: With the evolution of contemporary occupations mediated by digital technologies (DTs), there is a need for occupational therapists to develop and structure knowledge on how to support older adults’ engagement in occupations and social participation in a digitalised society.

    Objective: The objective of this study is to explore how tailoring to support older adults’ engagement in DT-mediated occupations could be schematised.

    Material and methods: The study employed a multiple case study methodology. There were nine cases, with each case involving an older adult undergoing a collaborative process to support engagement in DT-mediated occupations. The collaborative process was initiated through questionnaires, observations, and dialogues. Meetings and tailoring strategies were documented in fieldnotes and memos on tailoring, respectively. Semi-structured interviews concluded data collection. Cross-case synthesis was used in data analysis.

    Results: The result is a proposed scheme for tailoring to support older adults’ engagement in digital technology-mediated occupations, wherein strategies undertaken in the collaborative processes were synthesised and described.

    Conclusion and significance: The proposed scheme for tailoring could contribute to occupational therapists’ knowledge on how to support older adults’ engagement in contemporary occupations. Testing the model in various practice settings is recommended in order to enhance occupational therapy practice.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Ingeson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Blusi, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Nieves, Juan Carlos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Microsoft Hololens: A mHealth Solution for Medication Adherence2019In: Artificial Intelligence in Health: First International Workshop, AIH 2018, Stockholm, Sweden, 13-14 July, 2018, Revised Selected Papers / [ed] Koch F. et al., Springer, 2019, p. 99-115Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a smart mHealth application based on the augmented reality (AR)-paradigm that can support patients with common problems, related to management of their medication. This smart mHealth application is designed and implemented as a medication coach intelligent agent, called Medication Coach Intelligent Agent (MCIA). The MCIA has to manage different types of information such as the medication plan (medication regime) of the patients, medication restrictions, as well as the patient’s preferences and sensor input data from an AR-headset. Considering all this information, the MCIA leads with holistic decisions in order to offer personalized and unobtrusive interventions, in an autonomous way, to the patients. From a long-term perspective, the MCIA should also evaluate its performance over time and adapt in order to improve its interventions with the patients. To show the feasibility of our approach, a proof-of-concept prototype was implemented and evaluated. In this proof-of-concept prototype, the MCIA has been embodied as a smart augmented reality (AR)-mHealth application in the settings of a Microsoft HoloLens. The results show a high potential for using the MCIA in real settings.

  • 6.
    Ingeson, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Blusi, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Nieves, Juan Carlos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Smart augmented reality mHealth for medication adherence2018In: AIH 2018: Joint Workshop on AI in Health / [ed] Bichindaritz et.al ., 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a smart mHealth applicationbased on the augmented reality (AR)-paradigm that can support patients with common problems, related to management of their medication. This smart mHealth application is designed and implemented as a medication coach intelligent agent, called Medication Coach Intelligent Agent (MCIA). TheMCIA will have to manage different types of information such as the medication plan (medication regime) of the patients, medication restrictions, as well as the patient’s preferences andsensor input data from an AR-headset. Considering all this information, theMCIA leads with holistic decisions in order to offer personalized and unobtrusive inter-ventions, in an autonomous way, to the patients. From a long term perspective, the MCIAshould also evaluate its performance over time and adapt in order to improve its interventions with the patients. To show the feasibility of our approach,a proof-of-concept prototype was implemented and evaluated. The results showa high potential for using theMCIAin real settings.

  • 7.
    Jingar, Monika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Blusi, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Exploring Limitations of User Interface Design to Understanding the Gap Between Technology and Seniors2021In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 281, p. 931-935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participating in social activities promotes healthy ageing, whereas loneliness and isolation are known to cause adverse effects on both physical and mental wellbeing. Technology that exists in society today can facilitate healthy ageing. However, a gap can be seen between seniors and technology in today's internet and communication technological device's user interfaces. Due to limited prior knowledge of interacting with touch screen devices, seniors sometimes have difficulties using them. This research aims to explore the user interfaces and their elements designed using a human-centered design methodology by involving seniors as activate participants in the design process. This work's outcome can improve current user interface design practices in touch screen devices, which might be seen as contributing step to understand the gap between seniors and technology.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Lindgren, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Kampik, Timotheus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Guerrero, Esteban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Blusi, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Nieves, Juan Carlos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Argumentation-based Health Information Systems: A Design Methodology2021In: IEEE Intelligent Systems, ISSN 1541-1672, E-ISSN 1941-1294, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 72-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we present a design methodology for argumentation-based health information systems. With a focus on the application of formal argumentation, the methodology aims at eliciting requirements in regard to argumentation reasoning behavior, knowledge and user models, and business logic on levels below and above the argumentation layer. We highlight specific considerations that need to be made dependent on the system type, i.e., for clinical decision-support systems, patient-facing systems, and administration systems. In addition, we outline challenges in regards to the design of argumentation-based intelligent systems for healthcare, considering the state of the art of argumentation research, health information systems, and software design methods. For each challenge, we outline a mitigation strategy. 

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9.
    Olsson, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Otten, Julia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Blusi, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Lundberg, Elena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Hörnsten, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Experiences of transition to adulthood and transfer to adult care in young adults with type 1 diabetes: a qualitative study2023In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 79, no 12, p. 4621-4634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To explore young adults' experiences of living with type 1 diabetes in the transition to adulthood, including experiences of the transfer from paediatric to adult care.

    Design: A qualitative approach was used.

    Method: Ten young adults, six women and four men, aged 19–29 years, participated. Participants were recruited at their regular diabetes clinic from spring 2021 to spring 2022. Semi-structured interviews were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    Findings: Dreaming of being nurtured towards self-reliance was the overarching theme. Personal experiences of the transition to adulthood, including the transfer from paediatric to adult care, were described in terms of struggling to find balance in daily life, dealing with feelings of being different, being gradually supported to achieve independence, and wishing to be approached as a unique person in healthcare.

    Conclusion: In healthcare, it is important to emphasize not only diabetes-related factors but also emotional and psychosocial aspects of life connected to the transition to adulthood, including the transfer to adult care. The young adults wished to be seen as unique persons in healthcare during their emerging adulthood and should therefore be supported to achieve self-reliance through personal preparations for new challenges and for the consequences of transitioning to adulthood. Specialist nurses can provide appropriate knowledge and leadership.

    Implications for the Profession: These findings can guide nurse specialists in support for emerging adults to achieve self-reliance and indicate the importance of person-centred care when experiencing transition and transfer.

    Reporting Method: The study adhered to EQUATOR guidelines, and the COREQ checklist for qualitative studies was used as the reporting method.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf