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  • 1.
    Frost, Irina
    et al.
    Department of Regional Geography of Europe, Leibniz Institute for Regional Geography, Leipzig,Germany.
    Podkorytova, Maria
    Dept. of Regional Policy and Political Geography, Institute of Earth Sciences, Saint Petersburg State University, Universitetskaya naberezhnaya, Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Former Soviet cities in globalization: an intraregional perspective on interurban relations through networks of global service firms2018In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 59, no 1, p. 98-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an empirical study of the globalizing urbanlandscape in the post-Soviet region. In order to understand theposition of cities in relation to each other in the context ofeconomic globalization, the study considers the transnationalcity network in the post-Soviet region. At the center of analysis are the locational strategies of global service firms operating in the former Soviet cities. We adapt the interlocking network model proposed by the Globalization and World Cities research(GaWC) network to the regional level to uncover the interurban relations. Unlike the classical studies of the GaWC, this study focuses on the analysis of intraregional spatial patterns of glo-balization. The research shows that the globalizing regional city system is in the midst of substantial restructuring and that the state of former Soviet Union (FSU) cities in relation to Moscow is altering. The integration of FSU cities into the global economy mostly occurs through capital cities. However, under the current political and economic circumstances, the position of each capital city within the region has become diversified. The analysis indicates that the globalization of cities within a particular region reproduces similar processes on a world scale, which are characterized by spatial concentration and hierarchical relations. However, our research has shown that patterns of urban globalization at the regional level significantly depend on the historical context and national economic and political tendencies,thus creating conditions for the penetration of the world economy into cities.

  • 2.
    Frost, Irina
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Regional Geography, Leipzig, Germany.
    Podkorytova, Maria
    Saint Petersburg State University, Saint-Petersburg, Russia.
    Политический аспект глобализации постсоветского пространства: города и  государства: Political perspective on the post-soviet space globalization: cities and states2018In: World Economy and International Relations, ISSN 0131-2227, E-ISSN 2782-4330, Vol. 62, no 4, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a rapidly globalizing world, cities have acquired a prominent position. Thus, one can argue for a city-centric rather than a state-centric world. While not denying that globalization is assuredly changing a relationship between national states and cities, in the paper, the authors question the applicability of the city-centric globalization within the post-Soviet space. The paper addresses two questions. Firstly, by analyzing locational strategies of international organizations within the post-Soviet space, the study is aimed to reveal a relative level of globalization of post-Soviet cities. Secondly, through analysis of the list of globalizing cities within the post-Soviet space the authors explore the relationship between states and cities in the process of this globalization. Three types of international organizations have been investigated: diplomatic representatives, international government organizations and international non-government organizations. The study has revealed 28 cities highly involved in international political affairs. Even though cities from all post-Soviet states formed the final list, some ex-Soviet states are represented better than the others. Moreover, the lists of cities and countries are different regarding the type of international organizations. The results are discussed through the prism of the relationship between a city and a state. The analysis of the list of the cities leads to the conclusion of co-dependency between national conditions and the level of urban globalization. The paper argues the mutual interdependence between the involvement into globalization process and the significance of state institutions when the advantages of the world leading states and cities are continuously enlarging. This result acquires particular importance as in the current state of world cities’ research, the national aspect remains unexamined as a sort of hidden effect on space globalization. 

  • 3.
    Nenko, Aleksandra
    et al.
    ITMO University, Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Kurilova, Marina
    ITMO University, Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Podkorytova, Maria
    ITMO University, Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Emotional street network: a framework for research and evidence based on PPGIS2021In: Networks in the Global World V: NetGloW 2020 / [ed] Artem Antonyuk, Nikita Basov, Springer, 2021, p. 133-143Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we study subjective perception of the city space represented through geography of emotions. In particular, we analyze the continuity of user experience in the city, considering user emotions as connected states. To do this, we develop a concept of an "emotional street network" and analyze the integrity of human emotional experience through availability and connectivity of its emotional network, as well as its valence. To explore the relevance of the emotional street network concept, we use data from a public participation geoinformational system (PPGIS) Imprecity, where users can leave emoji and comments on their feelings in public spaces of 6 types – joy, anger, sorrow, fear, disgust, and surprise. Dataset consists of more than 2000 emotional marks from 600 unique users in open public spaces of St. Petersburg, Russia. Two networks of positive and negative emotions were built: the locations less than 500 m length from each other (a classic measure for pedestrian accessibility) marked with emoji were connected with Points to path algorithm in QGIS software, afterwards collated with the street-road network. The connectivity of the final networks was calculated through axial connectivity index using QGIS Space Syntax plug-in. Both resulting emotional street networks have hierarchical structure – more connected areas in the city center and less connected in the periphery. The negative emotional network is more dispersed, reflecting a more localized and geographically distanced character of negative emotions, covering more peripheral areas than the positive one.

  • 4.
    Nenko, Alexandra
    et al.
    ITMO University, Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Kurilova, Marina
    ITMO University, Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Podkorytova, Maria
    ITMO University, Saint Petersburg, Russia.
    Assessing public value of urban green zones through their public representation in social media2022In: Electronic Governance and Open Society: Challenges in Eurasia. EGOSE 2021 / [ed] Chugunov A.V., Janssen M., Khodachek I., Misnikov Y., Trutnev D., Springer, 2022, p. 186-200Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessing the potential of the cultural ecosystem services of green areas (values, images and behaviors that green areas offer to their visitors) is one of the tasks of the systemic development of natural ecosystems in the city. The article shows how data from geolocated social media, namely Instagram supplemented with Google Places and Strava, is used to analyze the representation of green areas in the perception of users as well as their actual use practices. In the study of Voronezh 33 topical green zones represented in Instagram posts are defined and the categories of public value of the green zones are constructed based on the hashtags. Three varying cases of urban green are analyzed in detail and compared to demonstrate the ability of the VGI to reveal differences in their public value. It is shown how different VGI sources supplement each other and give a more nuanced picture of the public value profile of the park. 

  • 5.
    Podkorytova, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Konuykhov, Artem
    Independent Researcher, Helsinki, Finland.
    Nenko, Oleksandra
    Turku Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Gunko, Maria
    The Centre on Migration, Policy and Society, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Periphery, uncertainty, and legacy: networks of global service firms within the former Soviet Union space2023In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses intercity networks within the former Soviet Union (FSU), a semi-periphery of the global economic system of interactions. Intercity networks are constructed following an assumption that interaction between offices of the same corporation indicates connectivity between cities. In the FSU global corporations operate against a backdrop of continuous uncertainty. Consequently, it is possible to estimate temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of uncertainty by looking at the evolving structures of global companies with the example of global advanced producer service (APS) companies. These companies are regarded as brokers, integrating the region into the global business activities. The dataset comprises structures of the APS firms within the region in 2015 and 2018. A comparative analysis of networks in 2015 and 2018 demonstrates temporal dynamics of network reconfiguration and unequal spatial distribution of corporate offices in uncertain conditions. Through the lens of the network transformation, we reveal the continuous restructuring and peripheralization of the region.

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  • 6.
    Podkorytova, Maria
    et al.
    Institute of Design and Urbanism, ITMO University, Russian Federation, 199034, St. Petersburg.
    Raskin, Ilja
    International Institute for Monitoring Democracy Development, Parliamentarianism and Suffrage Pro-tection of Citizens of IPA CIS Member Nations.
    Nenko, Aleksandra E.
    ITMO University.
    The idea of a city for people as a factor in the localization of protest voting in new residential complexes2022In: Vestnik of Saint Petersburg University. Sociology, ISSN 2541-9374, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 302-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gradual formation of income segregation in the post-Soviet city leads to the localization of protest voting. An important role in this process is played by new residential complexes (RCs), where a population with similar income levels and ideas about the quality of the living environment is accumulated. The gap between expectations and reality when purchasing housing under construction, as well as the discrepancy between the quality of the urban environment inside and outside the residential complex, lead to the emergence of hotbeds of protest voting in new residential complexes. The key concepts to explain such protest voting are “the right to the city” and “the city for the people.” Initially, these terms were associated with political activism aimed at increasing citizen participation in urban governance. On the territory of Russia, the idea of ​​a “city for people” becomes identical to the reproduction of its physical characteristics outside the political component. The attributes of a city for people, including safety, accessibility, and environmental comfort, are promoted by developers as part of marketing campaigns and influence demand. However, the systematic lack of declared elements in new residential complexes leads residents to political protest, which can be interpreted as the exercise of the right to the city, manifested in a critical attitude towards the infringement of the rights of residents by developers and city administration and a request for equal participation in city management. The article examines in detail an example of protest voting in the new residential complex “I am Romantic”, located in the alluvial territories of St. Petersburg. The polling station, located on the territory of a residential complex, stands out from neighboring polling stations in terms of the level of protest voting, which was especially pronounced in the elections for the governor of St. Petersburg. The gap between expectation and reality and between the internal space of a residential complex and the urban environment external to it pushes residents to protest voting.

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