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  • 1.
    Ekbäck, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Granåsen, Gabriel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Svärling, Rachel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Blomqvist, Ida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Henje Blom, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Clinical Effectiveness of Training for Awareness Resilience and Action Online Compared to Standard Treatment for Adolescents and Young Adults With Depression: Study Protocol and Analysis Plan for a Pragmatic, Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Superiority Trial2021In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 12, article id 674583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Depression in adolescents and young adults is an increasing global health concern. Available treatments are not sufficiently effective and relapse rates remain high. The novel group-treatment program “Training for Awareness, Resilience and Action” (TARA) targets specific mechanisms based on neuroscientific findings in adolescent depression. TARA is framed within the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria and has documented feasibility and preliminary efficacy in the treatment of adolescent depression. Since neurodevelopment continues well into the mid-twenties, age-adapted treatments are warranted also for young adults. Patients 15–22 years old, with either major depressive disorder (MDD) or persistent depressive disorder (PDD) according to the DSM-IV/5 or a rating >40 on the clinician rating scale Children's Depression Rating Scale—Revised (CDRS-R), will be recruited from specialized Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and local Youth-Clinics and randomized to either TARA or standard treatment, including but not limited to antidepressant medication and/or psychotherapy. Outcome measures will be obtained before randomization (T0), after 3 months of treatment (T1) and at 6-months- (T2) and 24-months- (T3) follow-up. Additionally, dose-response measures will be obtained weekly in the TARA-arm and measures for mediation-analysis will be obtained halfway through treatment (T0.5). Primary outcome measure is Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale (RADS-2) score at T1. Secondary outcome measures include RADS-2 score at T2, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children at T1 and T2, and CDRS-R at T1. Additional outcome measures include self-report measures of depression-associated symptoms, systemic bio-indicators of depression from blood and hair, heartrate variability, brain magnetic resonance imaging, as well as three-axial accelerometry for sleep-objectivization. Qualitative data will be gathered to reach a more comprehensive understanding of the factors affecting adolescents and young adults with depression and the extent to which the different treatments address these factors. In summary, this article describes the design, methods and statistical analysis plan for pragmatically evaluating the clinical effectiveness of TARA. This will be the first RCT to examine the effects of TARA compared to standard treatment for adolescents and young adults with MDD or PDD. We argue that this study will extend the current knowledgebase regarding the treatment of depression.

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  • 2.
    Ekbäck, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Rådmark, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Granåsen, Gabriel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Svärling, Rachel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Sörlin, Matilda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Schönbeck, Caspar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Henje Blom, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
    Clinical effectiveness of training for awareness, resilience, and action for adolescents and young adults with depression: the pilot phase of a multicenter randomized controlled trial2023In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 14, article id 1130035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Depression is a top-ranking global health concern increasing in magnitude. Available treatments for adolescents and young adults are not convincingly effective and relapse rates remain high. Training for Awareness, Resilience and Action (TARA) is a group treatment program targeting specific pathophysiological mechanisms of depression in young people. TARA is feasible, acceptable, preliminarily efficacious in depressed American adolescents, and it affects postulated brain-circuitry.

    Methods: As an initial step of a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT) we performed a single-arm multicenter pilot-study on TARA. Thirty-five depressed individuals (15–21 years old, 28 females) received TARA for 12 weeks face-to-face or online. Data was collected before (T0), during, and after the intervention (T1). The trial was pre-registered at clinicaltrials.gov, NCT Registration: identifier [NCT04747340]. Feasibility outcomes included recruitment, attendance rates, and session ratings. Adverse events were recorded weekly and extracted from medical records at the end of the trial. Primary effectiveness outcome was self-rated depression severity on Reynolds Adolescent Depression scale 2nd ed. at T1. Secondary outcomes were Children’s Depression Rating Scale-revised (CDRS-R) and Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC) at T1.

    Results: TARA was feasible and safe in the present trial. No significant RADS-2-change was seen (adjusted mean difference –3.26, 95 % CI –8.35 to 1.83; p= 0.20), however a significant decrease in CDRS-R scores is reported (adjusted mean difference –9.99, 95% CI –14.76 to –5.22; p < 0.001). MASC-scores did not change significantly (adjusted mean difference 1.98, 95% CI –0.96 to 4.91; p=0.18). Additional feasibility aspects are presented and discussed.

    Discussion: Limitations include substantial loss-to-follow-up, no randomization to control, and that some participants received concomitant treatment(s). The Coronavirus pandemic complicated both implementation and interpretation of the trial. In conclusion TARA was feasible and safe in depressed adolescents and young adults. Preliminary signs of effectiveness were seen. The initiated RCT will be important and worthwhile to conduct, and several improvements to the design are suggested based on the present results.

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  • 3.
    Rönnqvist, Louise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    McDonald, Rachel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sommer, Marius
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Influences of Synchronized Metronome Training on Soccer Players’ Timing Ability, Performance Accuracy, and Lower-Limb Kinematics2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, p. 1-16, article id 2469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning and performance of all complex movement requires timing, integration, and coordination between sensory-perception and motor production to be successful. Despite this, there is limited research into “if” and “how” timing training may influence movement performance in athletes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of synchronized metronome training (SMT) on sensorimotor timing ability, and in view of that, if improved timing may be transferred to lower-limb movement planning, precision performance, and kinematics. The sample consisted of 24 female elite- and semi-elite soccer players, randomly assigned to receive SMT and a control group. The SMT group received 12 sessions of Interactive Metronome® (IM) training over 4 weeks. At pre- and post-test, timing-precision was assessed through hand and feet movement synchronization with rhythmic sound; and leg-movements performance accuracy, duration, and kinematics were recorded during embodied high cognitive-load stepping task (6 trials×20 s) by use of a optoelectronic motion capture system. Pre- to post-test comparisons showed significant timing improvements as an effect of the IM training. Significant pre- to post-test improvements on the stepping task performance were seen in an increasing number of accurate foot taps during the stepping task sequence and by shorter duration for the SMT-group only. No evident pre- to post-test effects of SMT on the kinematic parameters investigated were found. These findings signify that the guided attention and working-memory functioning may be positively affected by SMT training; thereby, resulting in better motor planning, performance, and movement precision. Still, independent of group and test-occasion, significant correlations were found between the participants’ outcome performance differences and the kinematic parameters. It was found that a decreasing 3D movement distance and less segmented movements correlating negatively, and increasing velocity (speed) positively, with accuracy and performance duration, respectively. These findings are likely associated with inter-individual variations in the nature of higher-order cognitive processing capacity due to the highly cognitive demanding stepping task.

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1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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More styles
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  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
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  • html
  • text
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