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  • 1.
    Johansson, Jarkko
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Nordin, Kristin
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pedersen, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Karalija, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Papenberg, Goran
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Korkki, Saana M.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Guitart-Masip, Marc
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A, Stockholm, Sweden; Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. The Munich Center for the Economics of Aging, Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy, Munich, Germany.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Biphasic patterns of age-related differences in dopamine D1 receptors across the adult lifespan2023In: Cell Reports, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 42, no 9, article id 113107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Age-related alterations in D1-like dopamine receptor (D1DR) have distinct implications for human cognition and behavior during development and aging, but the timing of these periods remains undefined. Enabled by a large sample of in vivo assessments (n = 180, age 20 to 80 years of age, 50% female), we discover that age-related D1DR differences pivot at approximately 40 years of age in several brain regions. Focusing on the most age-sensitive dopamine-rich region, we observe opposing pre- and post-forties interrelations among caudate D1DR, cortico-striatal functional connectivity, and memory. Finally, particularly caudate D1DR differences in midlife and beyond, but not in early adulthood, associate with manifestation of white matter lesions. The present results support a model by which excessive dopamine modulation in early adulthood and insufficient modulation in aging are deleterious to brain function and cognition, thus challenging a prevailing view of monotonic D1DR function across the adult lifespan.

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  • 2.
    Nordin, Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Gorbach, Tetiana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Pedersen, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Panes Lundmark, Vania
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Johansson, Jarkko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    McNulty, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Papenberg, Goran
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kalpouzos, Grégoria
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    DyNAMiC: A prospective longitudinal study of dopamine and brain connectomes: A new window into cognitive aging2022In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, ISSN 0360-4012, E-ISSN 1097-4547, Vol. 100, no 6, p. 1296-1320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concomitant exploration of structural, functional, and neurochemical brain mechanisms underlying age-related cognitive decline is crucial in promoting healthy aging. Here, we present the DopamiNe, Age, connectoMe, and Cognition (DyNAMiC) project, a multimodal, prospective 5-year longitudinal study spanning the adult human lifespan. DyNAMiC examines age-related changes in the brain’s structural and functional connectome in relation to changes in dopamine D1 receptor availability (D1DR), and their associations to cognitive decline. Critically, due to the complete lack of longitudinal D1DR data, the true trajectory of one of the most age-sensitive dopamine systems remains unknown. The first DyNAMiC wave included 180 healthy participants (20–80 years). Brain imaging included magnetic resonance imaging assessing brain structure (white matter, gray matter, iron), perfusion, and function (during rest and task), and positron emission tomography (PET) with the [11C]SCH23390 radioligand. A subsample (n = 20, >65 years) was additionally scanned with [11C]raclopride PET measuring D2DR. Age-related variation was evident for multiple modalities, such as D1DR; D2DR, and performance across the domains of episodic memory, working memory, and perceptual speed. Initial analyses demonstrated an inverted u-shaped association between D1DR and resting-state functional connectivity across cortical network nodes, such that regions with intermediate D1DR levels showed the highest levels of nodal strength. Evident within each age group, this is the first observation of such an association across the adult lifespan, suggesting that emergent functional architecture depends on underlying D1DR systems. Taken together, DyNAMiC is the largest D1DR study worldwide, and will enable a comprehensive examination of brain mechanisms underlying age-related cognitive decline.

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  • 3.
    Nordin, Kristin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Karolinska Instituet, Department of Neurobiology.
    Pedersen, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Falahti, Farshad
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology.
    Johansson, Jarkko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Grill, Filip
    Radbound University, Donders Center for Cognitive Neroimaging.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Korkki, Saana
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Karolinska Instiutet, Department of Neurobiology.
    Zalesky, Andrew
    University of Melbourne, Department of Biomedical Engineering.
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). University of the Bundeswehr Munich, Department of Psychology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Karolinska Instiutet, Department of Neurobiology.
    Two long-axis dimensions of hippocampal cortical integration support memory functionacross the adult lifespanManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Nyberg, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Karalija, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Papenberg, Goran
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Pedersen, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Vikner, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Garrett, Douglas D.
    Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Lentzeallee 94, Berlin, Germany; Max Planck, UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, Lentzeallee 94, Berlin, Germany.
    Riklund, Katrine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Lövdén, Martin
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindenberger, Ulman
    Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Lentzeallee 94, Berlin, Germany; Max Planck, UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, Lentzeallee 94, Berlin, Germany.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Tomtebodavägen 18A, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Longitudinal stability in working memory and frontal activity in relation to general brain maintenance2022In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 20957Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive functions are well-preserved for some older individuals, but the underlying brain mechanisms remain disputed. Here, 5-year longitudinal 3-back in-scanner and offline data classified individuals in a healthy older sample (baseline age = 64–68 years) into having stable or declining working-memory (WM). Consistent with a vital role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC), WM stability or decline was related to maintained or reduced longitudinal PFC functional responses. Subsequent analyses of imaging markers of general brain maintenance revealed higher levels in the stable WM group on measures of neurotransmission and vascular health. Also, categorical and continuous analyses showed that rate of WM decline was related to global (ventricles) and local (hippocampus) measures of neuronal integrity. Thus, our findings support a role of the PFC as well as general brain maintenance in explaining heterogeneity in longitudinal WM trajectories in aging.

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  • 5.
    Pedersen, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    The architecture of the aging brain: functional reorganization, structural changes, and the role of dopamine receptors2023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aging is associated with reorganization of functional brain architecture, potentially leading tocognitive decline in older age. However, the mechanisms responsible for alterations in functionalbrain architecture remain poorly understood. Using a combination of multimodal neuroimagingtechniques and advanced statistical analyses in four independent studies, this thesis aims tocontribute to our understanding of age-related alterations in functional brain architecture andcognitive decline. Study I demonstrated age-related decline in functional brain network segregationin a longitudinal setting. Age-related changes in network segregation were associated withconcomitant losses of white matter integrity and domain-general cognitive function. Study II testedthe hypothesis that older age and lower dopamine D1-receptor (D1DR) availability concomitantly arerelated to less segregated network structure in older age. The results supported the hypothesis,revealing that greater D1DR availability in older age is associated with a more youth-like functionalarchitecture and greater working memory performance compared to age-matched counterparts withless D1DR. Study III further assessed the relationship between D1DR organization and functionalarchitecture. Using a non-linear decomposition method, we demonstrate that the spatial coexpression and distribution of D1DRs are aligned with the principal organization of brain function.Individual differences in D1DR distribution were related to the degree of functional differentiationbetween unimodal and transmodal cortices. Study IV investigated age-related differences in thefunctional organization of the hippocampus, revealing three overlapping modes of organization. Amedial-to-anterior and posterior mode largely corresponded to macroscale cortical organization ofconnectivity, aligned with local D1DR topography. Older age was associated with less distinctorganization of cortico-hippocampal connectivity, and maintenance of youth-like hippocampalorganization in older age was related to superior episodic memory function. Collectively, this thesisoffers multiple lines of evidence for age-related alterations in functional brain organization,associations with white-matter integrity and cognitive function, in addition to a novel link betweenfunctional brain architecture and the D1DR system.

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  • 6.
    Pedersen, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Geerligs, Linda
    Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radbound University, Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Gorbach, Tetiana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Avelar-Pereira, Bárbara
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, United States; Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    When functional blurring becomes deleterious: Reduced system segregation is associated with less white matter integrity and cognitive decline in aging2021In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 242, article id 118449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthy aging is accompanied by progressive decline in cognitive performance and concomitant changes in brain structure and functional architecture. Age-accompanied alterations in brain function have been characterized on a network level as weaker functional connections within brain networks along with stronger interactions between networks. This phenomenon has been described as age-related differences in functional network segregation. It has been suggested that functional networks related to associative processes are particularly sensitive to age-related deterioration in segregation, possibly related to cognitive decline in aging. However, there have been only a few longitudinal studies with inconclusive results. Here, we used a large longitudinal sample of 284 participants between 25 to 80 years of age at baseline, with cognitive and neuroimaging data collected at up to three time points over a 10-year period. We investigated age-related changes in functional segregation among two large-scale systems comprising associative and sensorimotor-related resting-state networks. We found that functional segregation of associative systems declines in aging with exacerbated deterioration from the late fifties. Changes in associative segregation were positively associated with changes in global cognitive ability, suggesting that decreased segregation has negative consequences for domain-general cognitive functions. Age-related changes in system segregation were partly accounted for by changes in white matter integrity, but white matter integrity only weakly influenced the association between segregation and cognition. Together, these novel findings suggest a cascade where reduced white-matter integrity leads to less distinctive functional systems which in turn contributes to cognitive decline in aging.

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  • 7.
    Pedersen, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Johansson, Jarkko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Nordin, Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Max-Planck-Institut für Sozialrecht und Sozialpolitik.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Bäckman, Lars
    Karolinska Insitutet & Stockholm University, Aging Research Center.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Dopamine D1-receptor organization contributes to functional brain architectureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Pedersen, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Johansson, Jarkko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nordin, Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Max-Planck-Institut für Sozialrecht und Sozialpolitik, Munich, Germany.
    Wåhlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Bäckman, Lars
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dopamine D1-receptor organization contributes to functional brain architecture2024In: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 44, no 11, article id e0621232024Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent work has recognized a gradient-like organization in cortical function, spanning from primary sensory to transmodal cortices. It has been suggested that this axis is aligned with regional differences in neurotransmitter expression. Given the abundance of dopamine D1-receptors (D1DR), and its importance for modulation and neural gain, we tested the hypothesis that D1DR organization is aligned with functional architecture, and that inter-regional relationships in D1DR co-expression modulate functional cross talk. Using the world's largest dopamine D1DR-PET and MRI database (N = 180%, 50% female), we demonstrate that D1DR organization follows a unimodal–transmodal hierarchy, expressing a high spatial correspondence to the principal gradient of functional connectivity. We also demonstrate that individual differences in D1DR density between unimodal and transmodal regions are associated with functional differentiation of the apices in the cortical hierarchy. Finally, we show that spatial co-expression of D1DR primarily modulates couplings within, but not between, functional networks. Together, our results show that D1DR co-expression provides a biomolecular layer to the functional organization of the brain.

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  • 9.
    Pedersen, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Johansson, Jarkko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Salami, Alireza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM). Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet& Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dopamine D1-signaling modulates maintenance of functional network segregation in aging2023In: Aging Brain, ISSN 2589-9589, Vol. 3, article id 100079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Past research has shown that as individuals age, there are decreases in within-network connectivity and increases in between-network connectivity, a pattern known as functional dedifferentiation. While the mechanisms behind reduced network segregation are not fully understood, evidence suggests that age-related differences in the dopamine (DA) system may play a key role. The DA D1-receptor (D1DR) is the most abundant and age-sensitive receptor subtype in the dopaminergic system, known to modulate synaptic activity and enhance the specificity of the neuronal signals. In this study from the DyNAMiC project (N = 180, 20-79y), we set out to investigate the interplay among age, functional connectivity, and dopamine D1DR availability. Using a novel application of multivariate Partial Least squares (PLS), we found that older age, and lower D1DR availability, were simultaneously associated with a pattern of decreased within-network and increased between-network connectivity. Individuals who expressed greater distinctiveness of large-scale networks exhibited more efficient working memory. In line with the maintenance hypotheses, we found that older individuals with greater D1DR in caudate exhibited less dedifferentiation of the connectome, and greater working memory, compared to their age-matched counterparts with less D1DR. These findings suggest that dopaminergic neurotransmission plays an important role in functional dedifferentiation in aging with consequences for working memory function at older age. 

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  • 10.
    Özalay, Özgun
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical and Translational Biology.
    Mediavilla, Tomás
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical and Translational Biology.
    Giacobbo, Bruno Lima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences. University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Hanzeplein 1, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Pedersen, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical and Translational Biology.
    Marcellino, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical and Translational Biology.
    Orädd, Greger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical and Translational Biology.
    Rieckmann, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical and Translational Biology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostics and Intervention. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Institute for Psychology, University of the Bundeswehr Munich, Neubiberg, Germany.
    Sultan, Fahad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical and Translational Biology.
    Longitudinal monitoring of the mouse brain reveals heterogenous network trajectories during aging2024In: Communications Biology, E-ISSN 2399-3642, Vol. 7, no 1, article id 210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The human aging brain is characterized by changes in network efficiency that are currently best captured through longitudinal resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI). These studies however are challenging due to the long human lifespan. Here we show that the mouse animal model with a much shorter lifespan allows us to follow the functional network organization over most of the animal’s adult lifetime. We used a longitudinal study of the functional connectivity of different brain regions with rs-fMRI under anesthesia. Our analysis uncovers network modules similar to those reported in younger mice and in humans (i.e., prefrontal/default mode network (DMN), somatomotor and somatosensory networks). Statistical analysis reveals different patterns of network reorganization during aging. Female mice showed a pattern akin to human aging, with de-differentiation of the connectome, mainly due to increases in connectivity of the prefrontal/DMN cortical networks to other modules. Our male cohorts revealed heterogenous aging patterns with only one group confirming the de- differentiation, while the majority showed an increase in connectivity of the somatomotor cortex to the Nucleus accumbens. In summary, in line with human work, our analysis in mice supports the concept of de-differentiation in the aging mammalian brain and reveals additional trajectories in aging mice networks.

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