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  • 1.
    Ericsson, Sarah
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenlund, Tova
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyström, Markus
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Öman Ekervhén, Lisa
    Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Police Work.
    Davis, Paul A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Psychological constructs in police investigative interview training2023Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As Swedish law enforcement embraces interviewing techniques that rely on psychological concepts and interpersonal skills, the teaching of these main ideas needs to be a central part of police education. This presentation willdiscuss how concepts familiar in psychology are understood and taught within Swedish police education today. Usingmaterials from the Swedish police authority, teaching resources, and the scientific literature, this presentation aimsto show how police education is adopting psychological perspectives and how psychological research and educationcan benefit in training police. We will also present future studies to further develop and incorporate psychologicalperspectives in educating law enforcement.

  • 2.
    Ericsson, Sarah
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenlund, Tova
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyström, Markus
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, lärande och teknik.
    Öman Ekervhén, Lisa
    Luleå tekniska universitet, Institutionen för hälsa, lärande och teknik.
    Carlsson, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Unit of Police Work.
    Davis, Paul A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Studying rapport and empathy training for investigative interviewing2023In: Abstracts from the First European Conference on Law Enforcement and Public Health, Umea 2023, Umeå University, 2023, p. 36-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A crucial part of the crime investigation process is the investigative interview. Each interview is aninstance of law enforcement and the public meeting to exchange information. Interviews thus carry agreat deal of weight in both the investigation and public relations. Although the main goal ofinterviewing is often to get information related to an investigation, interviews are also anopportunity for law enforcement to offer support, give information, gain trust, and connect withindividuals in the community. Previous research has found that a humane interviewing style thatfocuses on building trust, good communication, and remaining objective while listening to the otherperson’s account has advantages such as eliciting more detailed accounts and more truthfulinformation. This style of interviewing has also been shown to be strategically beneficial regardless ofif the interviewee is a suspect, witness, or victim. However, researchers are still debating how toimplement empathy and rapport-building behaviors in interviews. There is a great need for researchon how police officers acquire the core skills needed for good communication, building rapport, andestablishing trust during interviews. The aim of this project is to better understand how humane andempathetic interviewing is implemented in Swedish police education in order to achieve a largeremphasis on building and maintaining rapport, empathy, and emotion regulation. This project willuse both quantitative and qualitative methods to approach the research questions. The goal is tohelp the police both in getting as much information as possible, as well as improve the experiences ofthe interview for both the police and the interviewee. Understanding and implementing a morehumane approach to interviewing could help individual officers de-escalate tense situations andnavigate their own stress responses, as well as help strengthen community trust in policing wheninteracting with interviewees.

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  • ieee
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Language
  • de-DE
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
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  • Other locale
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