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  • 1. Archibold, Estelle
    et al.
    Jané, Sophie Elizabeth
    Bilimoria, Diana
    Sugiyama, Keimei
    Multi-level organizational factors that support and harm women’s self-confidence2018In: Academy of Mangement Proceedings: 2018, Academy of Management , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-confidence has been designated a requisite individual characteristic for advancement in the workplace. Historically, self- confidence has been associated more with men than women. As a result, research on self-confidence in the workplace has been conceived within masculine behavioral paradigms under a guise of gender neutrality. The purpose of our study is to expose potential social and contextual factors not broadly examined in the extant literature on individual self-confidence in the workplace. Utilizing a problematizing approach, we developed two research questions: (1) what are the contextual and situational factors of the organizational environment that positively influence women’s self-confidence?, and (2) what are the contextual and situational factors of the organizational environment that negatively influence women’s self- confidence? In our analysis of qualitative survey results of a sample of 299 women professionals, we found that meso-level (social) and macro-level (organizational) factors contribute to women’s experience of self-confidence in the workplace, in addition to micro- level factors, that receive the bulk of scholarly attention. We propose that individual factors interact with social and organizational factors and support or impinge upon the attainment of self-confidence in the workplace. We include recommendations for further study.

  • 2.
    Fernandez, Virginie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Jané, Sophie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Shared body puzzles: examining collective embodied sensemaking on the climbing wall2022Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Jané, Sophie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    "A safe space for outcasts”: how holding rituals engender collective trust in counter-institutional organizations2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4. Jané, Sophie Elizabeth
    Seeing risk: towards a process model of learning to perceive risky employees2018In: Academy of Mangement Proceedings: 2018, Academy of Management , 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Risk Perception, the subjective judgement that individuals make about the characteristics and severity of a risk, has been widely studied in the social science literature. In this paper, I provide evidence that risk perception is frequently conceptualized, and measured, as a static construct. I then argue for a re-conceptualization of risk perception as a dynamic, socio-psychological process. While studying risk perception as a static object allows researchers to explore questions such as what/where/when, studying risk perception as a process opens us the door to exploring how and why. To explore this re-framing empirically, I draw on a qualitative study of Principal Investigators hiring postdoctoral fellows to outline a process model that highlights how risk perceptions are constructed over time. I conclude with suggestions for future study.

  • 5.
    Jané, Sophie Elizabeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Sweitzer, Stormy Compeán
    Bilimoria, Diana
    Perceptions of group membership: bringing intentionality to the forefront of inclusion and exclusion2021In: Academy of Management Proceedings: 2021, Academy of Management , 2021Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to conceptualizing inclusion and exclusion in the workplace. Drawing on a review of the inclusion and exclusion literatures, we argue that individuals desire autonomy in choosing their group memberships. To reflect this, we propose a framework for the conceptualization of inclusion and exclusion that has two dimensions: belongingness and intentionality. From these two dimensions arise four states of perceived group membership: earned inclusion, earned exclusion, unearned inclusion and unearned exclusion. We build on these constructs by defining the process of transition between each state and provide examples to illustrate each pathway. Finally, we outline several propositions regarding the outcomes of earned and unearned social states in organizations. We conclude with the implications of our framework for management theory and practice, as well as suggestions for future study.

  • 6.
    Jané, Sophie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Fernandez, Virginie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Hällgren, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Shit happens. How do we make sense of that?2022In: Qualitative research in organization and management, ISSN 1746-5648, E-ISSN 1746-5656, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 425-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon how encountering trauma unexpectedly in the field informs the doing of fieldwork.

    Design/methodology/approach: A reflexive essay approach was adopted to explore traumatic incidents in extreme contexts. Written vignettes, interviews, field notes and information conversations served as the bases for reflections.

    Findings: Four themes arose from the reflections (Bracketing, Institutional Pressure, Impact on Research and Unresolvedness). It was suggested that researchers engaged in extreme context research, and management and organization studies scholars engaged in dangerous fieldwork more broadly, are under institutional pressure to continue work that may put themselves in harm's way. Traumatic experiences also shape and reflect the researcher's identity, which informs choices about current and future research projects.

    Research limitations/implications: It was suggested that scholars will benefit from reading the accounts of others to reduce the burden of isolation that can accompany traumatic field experiences.

    Originality/value: Exploring single traumatic events enabled in engaging with trauma encountered unexpectedly and directly in the field. The reflections reveal the effects of psychological and physical trauma on researchers, and highlight how trauma impacts the research process.

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  • 7.
    Jané, Sophie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Klopp, Jake
    Pettit, Krista
    It’s strategy. It’s practice. But what’s the motivation?: a social-symbolic work perspective on the “why’s” of strategy-as-practice2023Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Jané, Sophie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Sweitzer, Stormy
    Bilimoria, Diana
    "A bit of a wolf pack": the social-symbolic work of constructing a radically inclusive organization2021Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Jané, Sophie
    et al.
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
    Van Esch, Chantal
    Cal Poly, Pomona, California, USA.
    Bilimoria, Diana
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
    “Why’d You Wanna Study That?” A Process Model of the Under-Legitimation of a Research Topic2018In: Academy of Management Learning & Education, ISSN 1537-260X, E-ISSN 1944-9585, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 401-424Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Legitimacy is a desirable evaluation that confers substantial benefits to the subject. Although there is recognition that certain research topics struggle to gain legitimacy, the process through which this struggle is sustained remains unclear. To shed light on these dynamics, we analyzed data from an interview study of 31 gender in management scholars located on five continents. We find that gender in management scholarship is granted varying degrees of exchange, procedural, and comprehensibility legitimacy by both academic and non-academic groups. In response to these conflicting legitimacies, gender scholars are subsequently subjected to multiple rhetorical delegitimation strategies by the dominant academic community. To explain how these dynamics persist, we outline an overall process model of the under-legitimation of a research topic comprising four components: value-incongruence, mixed-legitimation, delegitimation, and negative outcomes for the production and dissemination of knowledge. Further, we introduce the concept of privilege legitimacy to describe the distinctive legitimacy afforded to the research topic by male gender in management scholars. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of the under-legitimation process and recommend that interventions are needed on the part of the dominant academic community to fully legitimate gender in management scholarship.

  • 10. McLaughlin, Hazel
    et al.
    Silvester, Jo
    Bilimoria, Diana
    Jané, Sophie
    Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University, USA.
    Sealy, Ruth
    Peters, Kim
    Möltner, Hannah
    Huse, Morten
    Göke, Juliane
    Women in Power: Contributing Factors that Impact on Women in Organizations and Politics; Psychological Research and Best Practice2018In: Organizational Dynamics, ISSN 0090-2616, E-ISSN 1873-3530, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 189-199Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we discuss the factors that influence women’s likelihood to gain positions of power, and what impedes women’s effectiveness once in these roles. We have reviewed the research from an international perspective and have highlighted the common trends that impact women across the globe. Although progress has been made, there is still much that needs to happen before equality of opportunity is realized. This paper highlights the macro and micro level factors that have an impact on women’s rise to powerful positions and the progress and reactions thereafter. The psychological research indicates that it is not sufficient to address the individual challenges of being a woman in business or in politics. The current emphasis is on women as individuals and relies on them taking action. But this fails to address the wider societal impacts. It is not sufficient for women to focus on building their networks, increasing their social capital and enhancing their motivation. This fails to take into account the institutional and societal biases that undermine opportunities for women. We recommend changes in the way that women approach opportunities in the workplace, and in the way that policy makers and employers act. We highlight the importance of embracing diversity more broadly, not simply from a gender perspective. Only in this way, can there be equality of opportunity and an enhancement of diversity in the workplace. We address the practical implications from the psychological research and provide advice for organizations, senior executives, women throughout their professional careers and for young women as they start their career journey.

  • 11. Sugiyama, Keimei
    et al.
    Jané, Sophie Elizabeth
    Bilimoria, Diana
    Doing more harm than good?: communicating the gender confidence gap2016In: Academy of Management Proceedings: 2016, Academy of Management , 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The claim that there is a gender confidence gap-women have lower self- confidence than men-identifies a critical issue for women in the workplace. What has yet to be explored is the possibility that communicating this issue creates a new stereotype threat that may negatively affect women’s performance. We examined the effect of a series of messages on stereotype threat and performance that were both consistent with and contradicting the gender confidence gap, as well as implicitly and explicitly comparing women and men. In Study 1, women perceived more stereotype threat than men after reading implicit messages consistent with the gender confidence gap. In Study 2, women performed better than men on a verbal task after reading the opposite message-women have higher confidence than men or that men have low confidence. A counter intuitive finding in Study 2 showed that despite having higher stereotype threat than women, men performed better than women in a numeric task given the message that women have higher confidence than men. These results suggest that gendered messages have differential consequences for men and women in their performance of sex-typed tasks.

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