Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alm, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Stoltz Sjöström, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Culinary Science.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Prevalence and risk factors for post discharge feeding problems in children born extremely preterm2023In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 76, no 4, p. 498-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Preterm infants have a high risk of post discharge feeding problems, but there is a lack of population-based studies in infants born extremely preterm and little is known about underlying mechanisms.The objectives were to assess the incidence of post discharge feeding problems and underweight in a population-based cohort of infants born extremely preterm in Sweden (EXPRESS) and identify perinatal risk factors.

    Methods: Perinatal health data and prenatal/postnatal growth data was prospectively collected in the cohort. Data on clinical diagnoses related to feeding problems were obtained from the Swedish Patient Register, population prevalence data was also obtained. The main outcome was a composite of post discharge feeding problem diagnosis and/or underweight at 2.5 years of age.

    Results: In total, 66 children (19%) had post discharge feeding problems diagnosed before 2 years and/or underweight at 2.5 years of age. The risk of feeding problems when compared to the general population was significantly higher, with an odds ratio (OR) of 193 (95% CI 137.6-270.9). The strongest risk factors for feeding problems were the number of days on mechanical ventilation during the first eight postnatal weeks, OR of 1.59 (CI 95% 1.29-1.98), and the Clinical Risk Index for Babies-score, OR of 1.14 (CI 95% 1.03-1.26).

    Conclusions: Post discharge feeding problems and underweight are common in children born extremely preterm. The strongest perinatal risk factor for later feeding problems was early treatment with mechanical ventilation. Identifying infants at risk of post discharge feeding problems might be useful for targeting of nutritional support.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Alm, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Stoltz Sjöström, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Nilsson Sommar, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Erythrocyte transfusions increased the risk of elevated serum ferritin in very low birth weight infants and were associated with altered longitudinal growth2020In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 109, no 7, p. 1354-1360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: There has been a lack of population‐based longitudinal data on serum ferritin in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants during hospitalisation. Our aim was to fill this gap in the knowledge and investigate risk factors for elevated serum ferritin and associations between erythrocyte transfusions and longitudinal growth.

    Methods: We retrospectively reviewed longitudinal data on 126 VLBW infants treated at Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, between 2010‐2013.

    Results: The infants’ mean gestational age and birth weight were 26.9 weeks and 899 grams. Most (91%) received erythrocyte transfusions and the majority had multiple erythrocyte transfusions. There was a significant correlation between serum ferritin and the volume of transfusions. Almost two‐thirds had at least one serum ferritin measurement of more than 350 µg/L, indicating iron overload. In those with complete anthropometric data (n=78) there was no significant effect of serum ferritin concentrations in relation to longitudinal growth, but there was a positive association between the erythrocyte transfusion dose and longitudinal growth in VLBW infants born before 25 weeks.

    Conclusion: This is the first population‐based study to investigate longitudinal data on serum ferritin in VLBW infants during hospitalisation. The unexpected positive finding in the subgroup born at less than 25 weeks needs further research with a larger cohort.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Gummesson, Christina
    et al.
    Faculty of Medicine, Faculty of Odontology, Lund University, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Alm, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. Department of Clinical Sciences, Futurum - the Academy for Health and Care, Region Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Cederborg, Anna
    Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ekstedt, Mattias
    Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hellman, Jarl
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hjelmqvist, Hans
    Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Jood, Katarina
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Neurology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Leanderson, Charlotte
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Möller, Riitta
    Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rosengren, Björn
    Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit, Department of Orthopedics and Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Själander, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Svensson, Peter J.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Särnblad, Stefan
    Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tejera, Alexander
    Division of Translational Cancer Research, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) for undergraduate medical education: development and exploration of social validity2023In: BMC Medical Education, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The development of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) as a framework for work-based training and assessment in undergraduate medical education has become popular. EPAs are defined as units of a professional activity requiring adequate knowledge, skills, and attitudes, with a recognized output of professional labor, independently executable within a time frame, observable and measurable in its process and outcome, and reflecting one or more competencies. Before a new framework is implemented in a specific context, it is valuable to explore social validity, that is, the acceptability by relevant stakeholders.

    Aim: The aim of our work was to define Core EPAs for undergraduate medical education and further explore the social validity of the constructs.

    Method and material: In a nationwide collaboration, EPAs were developed using a modified Delphi procedure and validated according to EQual by a group consisting of teachers nominated from each of the seven Swedish medical schools, two student representatives, and an educational developer (n = 16). In the next step, social validity was explored in a nationwide survey. The survey introduced the suggested EPAs. For each EPA, the importance of the EPA was rated, as was the rater’s perception of the present graduates’ required level of supervision when performing the activity. Free-text comments were also included and analyzed.

    Results: Ten Core EPAs were defined and validated. The validation scores for EQual ranged from 4.1 to 4.9. The nationwide survey had 473 responders. All activities were rated as “important” by most responders, ranging from 54 to 96%. When asked how independent current graduates were in performing the ten activities, 6 to 35% reported “independent”. The three themes of the free text comments were: ‘relevant target areas and content’; ‘definition of the activities’; and ‘clinical practice and learning’.

    Conclusion: Ten Core EPAs were defined and assessed as relevant for Swedish undergraduate medical education. There was a consistent gap between the perceived importance and the certainty that the students could perform these professional activities independently at the time of graduation. These results indicate that the ten EPAs may have a role in undergraduate education by creating clarity for all stakeholders.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf