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  • 1.
    Bandara, Tharindu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Animal Science and Export Agriculture, Uva Wellassa University, Badulla, Sri Lanka.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lau, Danny Chun Pong
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Retention of essential fatty acids in fish differs by species, habitat use and nutritional quality of prey2023In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e10158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Algae-produced long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA; with ≥20 carbon atoms) are key biomolecules for consumer production and animal health. They are transferred to higher trophic levels and accumulated in food chains. However, LC-PUFA accumulation in consumers and their trophic transfer vary with the diet quality and the physiological demand for LC-PUFA of consumers. The goal of this study was to investigate spatial and taxonomic differences in LC-PUFA retention of coastal fish predators that potentially differ in their habitat use (benthic versus pelagic) and prey quality. We analyzed the fatty acid (FA) composition of common fish species, namely roach and European perch, as well as their potential prey from benthic and pelagic habitats in three bays of the northern Baltic Sea. We then assessed whether the fish LC-PUFA retention differed between species and among the study bays with different diet quality, that is, LC-PUFA availability. Our data indicated taxon-specific differences in the retention of LC-PUFA and their precursor FA in fish (i.e., short-chain PUFA with <20 carbon atoms). Perch did not show any spatial variation in the retention of all these FA, while roach showed spatial differences in the retention of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and their precursor FA, but not eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Data suggest that diet quality and trophic reliance on benthic prey underlay the DHA retention differences in roach. Although the PUFA supply might differ among sites, the low spatial variation in LC-PUFA content of perch and roach indicates that both fishes were able to selectively retain dietary LC-PUFA. Climate change together with other existing human-caused environmental stressors are expected to alter the algal assemblages and lower their LC-PUFA supply for aquatic food webs. Our findings imply that these stressors will pose heterogeneous impacts on different fish predators. We advocate further investigations on how environmental changes would affect the nutritional quality of the basal trophic level, and their subsequent impacts on LC-PUFA retention, trophic ecology, and performance of individual fish species.

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  • 2.
    Bandara, Tharindu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Animal Science and Export Agriculture, Uva Wellassa University, Passara Road, Badulla, Sri Lanka.
    Wijewardene, Lishani
    Department of Limnology and Water Technology, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences & Technology, University of Ruhuna, Matara, Sri Lanka.
    Global research effort on hilsa shad (tenualosa ilisha): insights from scientometrics2023In: Thalassas, ISSN 0212-5919, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 981-996Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tenualosa ilisha also known as Hilsa shad is one of the important anadromous fish species in South Asia and some of the middle eastern countries because of its economic, cultural and ecological significance. The importance of hilsa shad in this region has driven a large number of scientific studies and quantification of these studies is important to identify the knowledge gaps and future research directions. For this purpose, we conducted a scientometric analysis on hilsa shad research published in Web of Science database between 2000 and 2022. Our results indicated that the number of articles on hilsa shad has increased from 2000 to 2019 and the number of articles published between 2000 and 2020 was correlated with global annual hilsa production during the same period. Keyword analysis of articles identified 10 thematic areas in hilsa shad research. The evolution of these thematic areas indicated that studies on 'the management of hilsa shad fisheries in the Bay of Bengal and surrounding countries' had more recent interest among the scientific community. On the other hand, studies on 'post-harvesting of hilsa shad products' have been more conventional and had fewer publications. Thematic areas related to hilsa shad stock assessment and genetics indicated that more state-of-art techniques are needed to gain a comprehensive understanding of the hilsa shad population structure. Studies on trophic ecology and hilsa shad aquaculture are key topics that need and novel technology-based research. More socio-economic studies are encouraged to understand the sustainability of hilsa fisheries management. Overall, our results highlight the necessity for improvements in local and international collaborations towards the sustainable management of trans-boundary hilsa shad fishery in the region.

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  • 3.
    Herath, Tharindu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Animal Science and Export Agriculture, Uva Wellassa University, Passara Road, Badulla, Sri Lanka.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Lau, Danny C. P.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Dataset on seston and zooplankton fatty-acid compositions, zooplankton and phytoplankton biomass, and environmental conditions of coastal and offshore waters of the northern Baltic Sea2022In: Data in Brief, E-ISSN 2352-3409, Vol. 42, article id 108158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyzed the taxonomic and fatty-acid (FA) compositions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, and the environmental conditions at three coastal and offshore stations of the northern Baltic Sea. Plankton samples for FA analyses were collected under the framework of sampling campaigns of the Swedish National Marine Monitoring program in September 2017. Monitoring data of phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass, and environmental variables at each station were extracted from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute database (https://sharkweb.smhi.se/). Monthly phytoplankton biomass at each station in July-September 2017 was aggregated by class (i.e., chyrsophytes, cryptophytes, dinoflagellates, diatoms, euglenophytes, cyanobacteria, etc.). Zooplankton biomass in September 2017 was aggregated by major taxa (i.e., Acartia sp. [Calanoida], Eurytemora affinis [Calanoida], Cladocera, Limnocalanus macrurus and other copepods (i.e. excluding Eurytemora and Acartia)). Environmental variables monthly monitored in January-October 2017 included salinity, concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, humic substances, total nitrogen and total phosphorus. These variables were measured from 0 to 10 m depth below water surface, and the depth-integrated averages were used for data analyses. Seston and zooplankton (Eurytemora affinis, Acartia sp. and Cladocera) FA compositions were analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC–MS). Our dataset could provide new insights into how taxonomic composition and biochemical quality of the planktonic food chains change with the environmental conditions in subarctic marine ecosystems.

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  • 4.
    Herath, Tharindu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Animal Science and Export Agriculture, Uva Wellassa University, Passara Road, 90000 Badulla, Sri Lanka.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lau, Danny C. P.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 75007 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Seawater browning alters community composition and reduces nutritional quality of plankton in a subarctic marine ecosystem2022In: Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 0706-652X, E-ISSN 1205-7533, Vol. 79, no 8, p. 1291-1301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inflows of coloured terrestrial organic matter cause seawater browning and reduced phytoplankton production in subarctic coastal ecosystems, potentially deteriorating the nutritional quality of marine food webs. We analyzed the fatty-acid (FA) compositions of seston and the zooplankton taxa Eurytemora affinis and cladocerans at three locations of the northern Baltic Sea. At the coastal and northerly locations, salinity and phosphorus concentrations were low, while concentrations of humic substances (i.e., terrestrial organic matter) were high. The southerly location showed the opposite trend. The ratio between alga-specific ?3 polyunsaturated FA and terrigenous monounsaturated FA (MUFA) in Eurytemora decreased from south to north, as did the ratio between the alga-specific docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and terrigenous MUFA in cladocerans. With increasing humic substances, the biomass of DHA-rich phytoplankton decreased and the zooplankton MUFA content increased. Our results indicate that coloured terrestrial organic matter alters the phytoplankton composition, consequently affecting the zooplankton nutritional quality.

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