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  • 1. Ponnu, Jathish
    et al.
    Schlereth, Armin
    Zacharaki, Vasiliki
    Działo, Magdalena A.
    Abel, Christin
    Feil, Regina
    Schmid, Markus
    Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
    Wahl, Vanessa
    The trehalose 6-phosphate pathway impacts vegetative phase change in Arabidopsis thaliana2020In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 768-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The vegetative phase change marks the beginning of the adult phase in the life cycle of plants and is associated with a gradual decline in the microRNA miR156, in response to sucrose status. Trehalose 6‐phosphate (T6P) is a sugar molecule with signaling function reporting the current sucrose state. To elucidate the role of T6P signaling in vegetative phase change, molecular, genetic, and metabolic analyses were performed using Arabidopsis thaliana loss‐of‐function lines in TREHALOSE PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE1 (TPS1), a gene coding for an enzyme that catalyzes the production of T6P. These lines show a significant delay in vegetative phase change, under both short and long day conditions. Induced expression of TPS1 complements this delay in the TPS1 knockout mutant (tps1‐2 GVG::TPS1). Further analyses indicate that the T6P pathway promotes vegetative phase transition by suppressing miR156 expression and thereby modulating the levels of its target transcripts, the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN‐LIKE genes. TPS1 knockdown plants, with a delayed vegetative phase change phenotype, accumulate significantly more sucrose than wild‐type plants as a result of a feedback mechanism. In summary, we conclude that the T6P pathway forms an integral part of an endogenous mechanism that influences phase transitions dependent on the metabolic state.

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  • 2.
    Zacharaki, Vasiliki
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ponnu, Jathish
    Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany; Institute for Plant Sciences, Cologne Biocenter, Universität zu Köln, Köln, Germany.
    Crepin, Nathalie
    Laboratory for Molecular Plant Biology, Biology Department, University of Leuven–KU Leuven, Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium; KU Leuven Plant Institute (LPI), Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium.
    Langenecker, Tobias
    Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
    Hagmann, Jörg
    Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
    Skorzinski, Noemi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
    Musialak-Lange, Magdalena
    Department of Plant Reproductive Biology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam, Germany.
    Wahl, Vanessa
    Department of Plant Reproductive Biology and Epigenetics, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam, Germany.
    Rolland, Filip
    Laboratory for Molecular Plant Biology, Biology Department, University of Leuven–KU Leuven, Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium; KU Leuven Plant Institute (LPI), Heverlee-Leuven, Belgium.
    Schmid, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
    Impaired KIN10 function restores developmental defects in the Arabidopsis trehalose 6-phosphate synthase1 (tps1) mutant2022In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 235, no 1, p. 220-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensing carbohydrate availability is essential for plants to coordinate their growth and development. In Arabidopsis thaliana, TREHALOSE 6-PHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 1 (TPS1) and its product, trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P), are important for the metabolic control of development. tps1 mutants are embryo-lethal and unable to flower when embryogenesis is rescued. T6P regulates development in part through inhibition of SUCROSE NON-FERMENTING1 RELATED KINASE1 (SnRK1).

    Here, we explored the role of SnRK1 in T6P-mediated plant growth and development using a combination of a mutant suppressor screen and genetic, cellular and transcriptomic approaches.

    We report nonsynonymous amino acid substitutions in the catalytic KIN10 and regulatory SNF4 subunits of SnRK1 that can restore both embryogenesis and flowering of tps1 mutant plants. The identified SNF4 point mutations disrupt the interaction with the catalytic subunit KIN10.

    Contrary to the common view that the two A. thaliana SnRK1 catalytic subunits act redundantly, we found that loss-of-function mutations in KIN11 are unable to restore embryogenesis and flowering, highlighting the important role of KIN10 in T6P signalling.

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