Umeå University's logo

umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Chiappino-Pepe, Anush
    et al.
    Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, MA, Boston, United States; Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, MA, Boston, United States; Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA, Cambridge, United States.
    Pandey, Vikash
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Billker, Oliver
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). The Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden, Umeå, Sweden.
    Genome reconstructions of metabolism of Plasmodium RBC and liver stages2021In: Current Opinion in Microbiology, ISSN 1369-5274, E-ISSN 1879-0364, Vol. 63, p. 259-266Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) offer a powerful means of integrating genome and biochemical information on an organism to make testable predictions of metabolic functions at different conditions and to systematically predict essential genes that may be targeted by drugs. This review describes how Plasmodium GEMs have become increasingly more accurate through the integration of omics and experimental genetic data. We also discuss how GEMs contribute to our increasing understanding of how Plasmodium metabolism is reprogrammed between life cycle stages.

  • 2.
    Russell, Andrew J.C.
    et al.
    Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
    Sanderson, Theo
    Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom; Francis Crick Institute, 1 Midland Road, London, United Kingdom.
    Bushell, Ellen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
    Talman, Arthur M.
    Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom; MIVEGEC, University of Montpellier, IRD, CNRS, Montpellier, France.
    Anar, Burcu
    Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
    Girling, Gareth
    Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
    Hunziker, Mirjam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Kent, Robyn S.
    Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, VT, Burlington, United States.
    Martin, Julie S.
    Wellcome Centre for Integrative Parasitology, Institute of Infection, Immunity, and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Metcalf, Tom
    Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
    Montandon, Ruddy
    Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
    Pandey, Vikash
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Pardo, Mercedes
    The Institute of Cancer Research, London, United Kingdom.
    Roberts, A. Brett
    Wellcome Centre for Integrative Parasitology, Institute of Infection, Immunity, and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Sayers, Claire
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Schwach, Frank
    Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
    Choudhary, Jyoti S.
    The Institute of Cancer Research, London, United Kingdom.
    Rayner, Julian C.
    Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Voet, Thierry
    Department of Human Genetics, University of Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; KU Leuven Institute for Single Cell Omics, LISCO, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
    Modrzynska, Katarzyna K.
    Wellcome Centre for Integrative Parasitology, Institute of Infection, Immunity, and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Waters, Andrew P.
    Wellcome Centre for Integrative Parasitology, Institute of Infection, Immunity, and Inflammation, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Lawniczak, Mara K.N.
    Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, United Kingdom.
    Billker, Oliver
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Regulators of male and female sexual development are critical for the transmission of a malaria parasite2023In: Cell Host and Microbe, ISSN 1931-3128, E-ISSN 1934-6069, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 305-319.e10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malaria transmission to mosquitoes requires a developmental switch in asexually dividing blood-stage parasites to sexual reproduction. In Plasmodium berghei, the transcription factor AP2-G is required and sufficient for this switch, but how a particular sex is determined in a haploid parasite remains unknown. Using a global screen of barcoded mutants, we here identify genes essential for the formation of either male or female sexual forms and validate their importance for transmission. High-resolution single-cell transcriptomics of ten mutant parasites portrays the developmental bifurcation and reveals a regulatory cascade of putative gene functions in the determination and subsequent differentiation of each sex. A male-determining gene with a LOTUS/OST-HTH domain as well as the protein interactors of a female-determining zinc-finger protein indicate that germ-granule-like ribonucleoprotein complexes complement transcriptional processes in the regulation of both male and female development of a malaria parasite.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3. Stanway, Rebecca R.
    et al.
    Bushell, Ellen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Chiappino-Pepe, Anush
    Roques, Magali
    Sanderson, Theo
    Franke-Fayard, Blandine
    Caldelari, Reto
    Golomingi, Murielle
    Nyonda, Mary
    Pandey, Vikash
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Laboratory of Computational Systems Biotechnology, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, EPFL, Lausanne 1015, Switzerland.
    Schwach, Frank
    Chevalley, Séverine
    Ramesar, Jai
    Metcalf, Tom
    Herd, Colin
    Burda, Paul-Christian
    Rayner, Julian C.
    Soldati-Favre, Dominique
    Janse, Chris J.
    Hatzimanikatis, Vassily
    Billker, Oliver
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Wellcome Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK.
    Heussler, Volker T.
    Genome-Scale Identification of Essential Metabolic Processes for Targeting the Plasmodium Liver Stage2019In: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 179, no 5, p. 1112-1128.e1-e15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmodium gene functions in mosquito and liver stages remain poorly characterized due to limitations in the throughput of phenotyping at these stages. To fill this gap, we followed more than 1,300 barcoded P. berghei mutants through the life cycle. We discover 461 genes required for efficient parasite transmission to mosquitoes through the liver stage and back into the bloodstream of mice. We analyze the screen in the context of genomic, transcriptomic, and metabolomic data by building a thermodynamic model of P. berghei liver-stage metabolism, which shows a major reprogramming of parasite metabolism to achieve rapid growth in the liver. We identify seven metabolic subsystems that become essential at the liver stages compared with asexual blood stages: type II fatty acid synthesis and elongation (FAE), tricarboxylic acid, amino sugar, heme, lipoate, and shikimate metabolism. Selected predictions from the model are individually validated in single mutants to provide future targets for drug development.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf